Is Sessions Out? AG Offers to Quit as Trump’s Russia Frustration Mounts

Sessions leaving office, could mean good news for cannabis advocates.

Even Donald Trump is sick of Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

Sessions, America’s all-purpose antebellum bogeyman and the greatest existential threat currently faced by the legal marijuana industry, offered the president his resignation last month, in response to Trump’s mounting frustration with Sessions’s ties to Russia, POLITICO reported.

Read more at Cannabis Now

Thank Russia: Jeff Sessions Now Too Preoccupied to Crack Down on Marijuana

Today, Thursday, March 2, Attorney General Jeff Sessions finds himself in a world of shit.

The beady-eyed hobgoblin of the marijuana industry’s nightmares must now navigate an ordeal of his own, after news broke late Wednesday, courtesy of officials inside Sessions’ own Justice Department, that he indeed had talks with top Russian officials last year—before telling fellow senators at his Jan. 10 confirmation hearings the exact opposite.

(This is a bit shocking—we don’t really expect top law enforcement officers to play around with the facts, even in an alternative fact-based administration—but not entirely surprising. Sessions, according to spot-on journalist Louise Mensch, is the man most responsible for recruiting to Donald Trump’s foreign policy team conduits to Russia like the mendacious fact-dodger Carter Page.)

Read more at High Times

Meet the Stoners Who Have to Go on ‘Treasure Hunts’ for Weed

The rise of the dark web has made it increasingly easy for users to buy illicit drugs, especially weed: Cannabis is the most popular drug on marketplaces like Agora, Evolution and Silk Road 2. 

While purchasing substances on these marketplaces may be easy thanks to user reviews—in Russia, getting your hands on them can turn into quite a difficult process.

Drug-related penalties in the country are harsh, even small possession of marijuana can result in three to 10 years behind bars. And just like the rest of the world, cannabis is widely used, accounting for 70 percent of illicit drugs seized by Russian authorities.  

Read more at High Times