Percolation Litigation: RooR Sues Over Bogus Bongs

The German glass brand RooR made a name for itself in the 90s with meticulously crafted pipes and bongs that bucked the aesthetic trends of the time, forsaking psychedelic swirls and glittering marbles in favor of sharp, clean lines and scientific precision. The impact on the market was swift, and it didn’t take long for knockoffs and counterfeits to start hitting store shelves. Now, perhaps emboldened by the shifting legal landscape surrounding cannabis in the United States, RooR has filed almost 200 lawsuits alleging trademark  infringement in the past year.

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (AP) — In the rarefied world of high-end bong makers, Roor glass water pipes have long been smoked to impress. The status symbols are so sought after that some models command prices of $1,000. There’s even a diamond-studded, gold-gilded Roor that goes for nearly $4,000.

Both marijuana and the tools used to smoke it remain illegal under federal law, but that hasn’t stopped Roor and its American licensee from using the federal courts to protect the brand and its sales.

Read more at Cannabis Now

Safe Harbor for Cancer Patients: Jetty Extracts

Safe Harbor for Cancer Patients: Jetty Extracts

A Jetty is a pier built with the intention of protecting boats in the harbor, and houses near the shore. It’s very function is one of serenity, one of silent protection for a community exposed to the elements. So it’s only fitting that Jetty Extracts would have a similar role in their community as well. Their program, aptly named The Shelter Project, is a no-cost service available to any cancer patient with a valid medical recommendation.

Those who sign up are eligible to receive up to four free products a month courtesy of Jetty Extracts and their donors. Products range from oil cartridges to rosin. Some patients choose to use cannabis oil in junction with chemotherapy, some use it in holistic approaches that are chemo and radiation free, and even veteran cancer survivors use products from the Shelter Project to maintain wellness and deal with the traumatic effects of cancer.

Read more at Dope Magazine

Hawaiian Dutch: Size and Flavor Explosion

Hawaiian Dutch: Size and Flavor Explosion

26.9% THC 0.13% CBD | Tested By: Chemhistory

Hawaiian Dutch is an exclusive strain offered by Terra Canna Farms located in Damascus Oregon.   When we walked into the grow room we were blown away!   She is definitely a size queen.  I have seen my fair share of grow rooms and I’ve never seen colas this big in my life!

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The Hidden Stash: White Pass Ski Area

The Hidden Stash: White Pass Ski Area

As moisture collects and travels south along the Cascade Mountain Range, a large collection of Nimbus clouds form in the shadow of Mt Rainier. With average winter temperatures, those Nimbus clouds release condensed moisture at freezing levels that formulate ice crystals that bond together to create one of nature’s purest and most beautiful pieces of art, the snowflake.

Storms come and go throughout the cold, blistery months of fall and winter in the central Cascades. One publicly accessible area, just outside of Yakima, Washington, experiences the harsher side of winter and turns into a winter playground for all ages and abilities. This place I speak of my friends is White Pass Ski Resort. Each and every winter the Pigtail Peak and Hogsback ridge get summited by thousands of snow sport enthusiasts. Once a training ground for ski legends Phil and Steve Mahre, this family oriented resort brings back locals year after year with its good vibes and good shred tribes. The roads leading to White Pass Ski Resport are kept to the highest grooming standard, even during those gnarly northwest storms.

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Six Cannabis Advocates in Sports

The times are changing. With an increasing number of states legalizing marijuana and the desire to find out its health benefits, the country’s views on cannabis has softened as it’s become more widely accepted—except in sports. From NFL stars to NBA ballers to the top MMA fighters, these are six of the strongest advocates for medical marijuana.

Ricky Williams

Williams is arguably the most famous marijuana smoker in NFL history, earning multiple weed-related suspensions while playing in the league. Williams even quit playing football to smoke marijuana–that’s dedication! Now that he’s retired from the gridiron, the former Texas star running back is a partner in the first cannabis gym–Power Plant Fitness–based in San Francisco.

Read more at Dope Magazine

Cannabis Concentrates: Extraction’s Resin Renaissance

Marijuana maestro, Ed Rosenthal, is a certified legend in the world of cannabis publishing. His latest book, “This Bud’s for You,” offers up a fresh, eclectic selection of essays and articles by some of the world’s finest cannabis writers, including a few members of Cannabis Now’s editorial team. Enjoy this exclusive sample — a reflection on the early days of dabs.

Centuries after we’ve all toked our last, when hash historians of the future trace the evolution of whatever fantastic extracts they’re ingesting, they will break everything down into the BD and AD eras – Before Dabs and After Dabs.

The social buzz around dabbing has done more than ignite new interest in the very old idea of extracting and concentrating cannabis compounds. This resin renaissance has created a new cultural framework for the categorization and consumption of concentrates.

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Toke Grenades: DC Activists Pull Off Marijuana Fueled Trump Protest

“America first” floated into a cloud of marijuana smoke. 

A marijuana-themed protest of Donald Trump’s inauguration went off as planned on Friday, with several thousand (sort-of-legal) cannabis joints distributed and at least several hundred smoked four minutes into Trump’s first address as the nation’s chief executive.

As much less mellow protesters burned trash cans on K Street and President Donald Trump’s triumphant Inauguration Day parade trundled past empty bleachers, activists with DCMJ—the organization behind the successful 2014 ballot measure that legalized marijuana possession and cultivation in Washington, D.C.fulfilled their vow to mark the occasion with a protest smoke.

Read more at High Times

Iceland Figured Out How to Stop Teen Drug Substance Abuse—Can the Rest of the World to Do the Same?

In Iceland, teenage smoking, drinking and drug use have been radically cut in the past 20 years. Emma Young, of Mosaic Science, writes how they did it, and why other countries won’t follow suit. An abridged version of that article was written for HIGH TIMES by Maureen Meehan.

Twenty years ago Icelandic teens were among the heaviest-drinking youths in Europe. Today, it is exactly the opposite.

How did Iceland Do It?

Read more at High Times

Marijuana Under Trump: It Won’t Get Better

The near-continuous rank speculation that’s been a way of life in America since the early-morning hours of Nov. 9 ends today. At noon, Donald J. Trump took the oath of office and was sworn in as the 45th president of the United States. He’ll now have access to the @POTUS Twitter handle and the nuclear codes—perhaps using one to announce, in real time, what he plans to do with the other—and then sometime, maybe this afternoon, maybe over the weekend, in between presiding over inaugural balls or empowering alt-right internet trolls, President Trump will get around to figuring out exactly what he’s going to do about all those grandiose (and, in some cases, unconstitutional) campaign promises.

So where, exactly, do drug policy reform and the country’s marijuana industry fit into making America great again?

Already dealing with a president in open conflict with his own country’s intelligence community, who has a defense policy that’s driven deep fear into many of America’s oldest allies, it may be hard for much of the country to care about drug policy. But there is much at stake.

Read more at High Times

Obama’s Many Commutations Overlooked Women Inmates, Say Advocates

On President Obama’s last day in office, he granted another 330 commutations to nonviolent drug offenders, bringing his total number of clemencies to 1,715—more than the last 12 presidents combined.

But clemency advocates argue that Obama’s clemency policy consistently overlooked one group: women.

Of the 1,715 individuals who received commuted sentences under Obama, fewer than 100 were women.

Read more at High Times