Sessions Makes Bizarre Plea in Washington Post to Go Along with His Drug War

Oh, Attorney General Jeff Sessions, why do you say such things? Are you willfully ignorant or were you born in the wrong century?

Even with so much happening in and around the White House these days, there are a few things in your background that might shed light on your out of touch, fact-challenged, bigoted screed and they include: your white supremacist ties, racist and homophobic legislative voting record and a history of opposing voting rights, to highlights just a few.

And wasn’t there something about the KKK? One of the four lawyers who worked with our illustrious attorney general and former senator from Alabama said Sessions told him he thought the KKK was, “OK until I found out they smoked pot.” Surely you were joking, sir. No?

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Casualties of War: How Prohibition Affects Education

The devastating impact of the War on Drugs extends to higher education, as students caught with pot face losing out on federal financial aid and often, consequently, on an education. Drug offenses are the only crimes that must be reported on federal student-aid applications, and that’s unlikely to change under a new administration laden with drug warriors.

Christy Billett could be the poster child for exposing the enduring perniciousness of the Drug War’s attack on American college students. Her story also stands as a stark warning about what many students may face under the Trump administration with an Education Department headed by Betsy DeVos and a Justice Department led by Jeff Sessions.

Back in 2000, Billett—then a working-class young woman of 18—was a few courses shy of completing her associate’s degree at DuBois Business College in rural Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, where she was enrolled in a program that would have made her a medical-transcription administrator. But she found herself entrapped in a sting by a friend’s father, a man with cancer who had asked his son to find him a source of marijuana to ease his pain. Billett, who had some pot and occasionally sold some, offered to sell him two ounces, but it turned out he was setting her up. While closing the deal, Billett was arrested and, without an attorney, agreed to make a statement to police. She subsequently hired a lawyer who managed to get the court to change her plea to “no contest,” but the damage was done. A convicted drug felon under Pennsylvania law, when Billett filed a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) in January 2001 to cover her final semester’s tuition, she discovered that she was permanently banned from receiving any federal tuition grants or student loans.

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Radical Rant: Feds Move to Increase Opiate Deaths & Accidental Child Overdoses

How does one explain the tortured logic of a malevolent Slingblade Hobbit?

I’m talking about the Attorney General of the United States (for now) and demented love child of Forrest Gump and a Keebler Elf, the doubly-traitor-named Jefferson Beauregard Sessions III.

JeffBo is a walking, talking 1980s-Just-Say-No relic, as if we grew him from clones of Nancy Reagan’s DNA found in some fossilized tree sap in Lafayette Park. This guy sees a latent heroin addict in every pot smoker and has used that debunked gateway drug talking point repeatedly.

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Breaking: Jeff Sessions Goes After Congressional MMJ Protections

In a May 1 letter to Congress, Attorney General Jeff Sessions asked for authority to prosecute individuals in states that have legalized marijuana for recreational or medical use.

As reported by Tom Angell of MassRoots, the letter asks Congress to eliminate the Rohrabacher-Farr amendment, which prevents the Justice Department from using federal funds for prosecution of federal marijuana offenses where states have passed medical marijuana laws authorizing such use. Angell obtained the letter from a congressional staffer.  The authenticity of the letter has been independently verified by the Washington Post.

Sessions notes in this letter that marijuana is illegal under various federal laws and complains that the U.S. Court of Appeals has “interpreted this provision broadly to apply to both the Department’s actions that prevent states from implementing their laws regarding medical marijuana and to Department prosecution of individuals and organizations that operate under those laws.”

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Legalization in Trump’s America: Skating on Thin Ice

With an aggressive executive branch openly defying constitutional checks on its authority and installing noted prohibitionists in key positions, will the Trump administration make America raid again?

The cannabis industry’s general policy seems to be avoidance of “bad vibes” at all costs —  even when that means ignoring the pounding vibrations of an oncoming freight train.

The first few weeks of Donald Trump’s presidency have revealed an unprecedented disregard for the constitutional checks and balances on the executive branch. That doesn’t bode well for an industry already precariously balanced on a tenuous high-wire of precedents, amendments and memos.

Read more at Cannabis Now

Left Behind by Clemency

What’s beef? Beef is when a rap video means the difference between a four-year sentence and 20 to life as a “cannabis kingpin.”

Jane Scarmazzo isn’t positive when her younger son started smoking pot, but she knows for sure how she found out about it.

Luke was in his early 20s, a few years out of high school and working with his father Nick Scarmazzo — a union carpenter — on bridges and overpasses in the San Francisco Bay Area.

Read more at Cannabis Now

DEA Chief: ‘Marijuana Is Not Medicine… It’s a Joke’

At an event yesterday at the Cleveland Clinic concerning “Our Nation’s Opioid Epidemic,” acting head of the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), Chuck Rosenberg, stated that “marijuana is not medicine.”

The Washington Examiner reported that Rosenberg said, “If it turns out that there is something in smoked marijuana that helps people, that’s awesome. I will be the last person to stand in the way of that… But let’s run it through the Food and Drug Administration process, and let’s stick to the science on it.”

Note the use of the term “smoked marijuana.”

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Pot Matters: Trump, Belief and the Drug War

The president of the Philippines, Rodrigo Duterte, likes to kill drug dealers and users, or, at least, he’s been known to kill them.

Once, he said he would be “happy to slaughter” millions of drug addicts, though he later apologized (mostly, though, for comparing himself to Adolph Hitler). Nonetheless, for Duterte, the War on Drugs is, literally, a drug war in which he has encouraged citizens, as explained by CBS News, “to shoot and kill drug dealers.”

The President of the United States, Donald Trump, recently praised Duterte for this strategy.  Once again, according to CBS, Trump told the Philippine president “I just want to congratulate you because I am hearing of the unbelievable job on the drug problem… Many countries have the problem, we have a problem, but what a great job you are doing, and I just wanted to call and tell you that.”

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Zealous Prosecutor Leading Review of Violent Crime in Cities

BY SADIE GURMAN

ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON (AP) — A zealous prosecutor who was crucial in writing the Justice Department’s new policy encouraging harsher punishments for criminals is now turning his attention to hate crimes, marijuana and the ways law enforcement seizes suspects’ cash and property.

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Jeff Sessions’ Phony Marijuana War

On Thursday, Attorney General Jeff Sessions, America’s cheerful white-hooded Smeagol, was in Memphis selling his vision of the country as a violent wasteland beset by ruthless criminals and mindless gang members preying on helpless innocents.

Speaking to an appreciative audience of about 100 law-enforcement officers—the likes of whom have been “under siege” in the United States in recent years, according to Congressman David Kustoff, a former local federal prosecutor—Sessions reiterated his tough-on-crime, more-is-less solution.

The only hope for civilization in our time is more mandatory minimum sentences for drug crimes, locking more people up for longer periods of time.

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