Review Identifies 140 Controlled Clinical Trials Related to Cannabis

Scientists have conducted over 140 controlled clinical trials since 1975 assessing the safety and efficacy of whole-plant cannabis or specific cannabinoids, according to a new literature review published in the journal Critical Reviews in Plant Sciences.

A team of German researchers identified 140 clinical trials involving an estimated 8,000 participants. Of these, the largest body of literature focused on the use of cannabis or cannabinoids in the treatment of chronic or neuropathic pain. Authors identified 35 controlled studies, involving 2,046 subjects, assessing the use of marijuana in pain treatment. In January, the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine released a comprehensive review acknowledging that “conclusive or substantial evidence” exists for cannabis’ efficacy in patients suffering from chronic pain.

Cannabinoids have also been well studied as anti-emetic agents and as appetite stimulants. Researchers identified 43 trials evaluating marijuana or its components for these purposes, involving total 2,498 patients. They also identified an additional 14 trials examining the role of cannabis or cannabis-derived extracts in the treatment of multiple sclerosis.

Read more at NORML

Marijuana Munchies Explained by Science

Scientific studies are beginning to successfully unravel the mystery of why we get the munchies—THC stimulates appetite by regulating a group of neurons that normally suppress the appetite—even when we’re definitely not hungry.

Hence, the use of medical marijuana in the treatment of patients dealing with a loss of appetite due to complications with chemotherapy, cancer or HIV, to name a few.

Herein lies one of the pot paradoxes—weed smokers generally have a lower body mass index (BMI) and are less at risk for diabetes.

Read more at High Times