The Feds Don’t Want Parents Locking Up Their Pot

As cannabis policies at the state and federal levels continue down divergent paths, Stashlogix — a company trying to help people (particularly parents) store their pot responsibly — has had an entire shipment of their child proof containers seized by U.S. Customs and Border Patrol. Apparently the feds don’t want parents keeping their kids out of their stash.

Shortly after Colorado started adult use cannabis sales in January 2014, Skip Stone decided he wanted to create a cool yet functional lockable stash container so his fellow cannabis parents could keep all their ganja goodies safe from their kids.

“Seeing all the gummies and candy bars really helped inspired it,” Stone said, adding that — at the time — the go-to storage option for parents attempting discretion were things like shoe boxes.

Read more at Cannabis Now

Sessions Makes Bizarre Plea in Washington Post to Go Along with His Drug War

Oh, Attorney General Jeff Sessions, why do you say such things? Are you willfully ignorant or were you born in the wrong century?

Even with so much happening in and around the White House these days, there are a few things in your background that might shed light on your out of touch, fact-challenged, bigoted screed and they include: your white supremacist ties, racist and homophobic legislative voting record and a history of opposing voting rights, to highlights just a few.

And wasn’t there something about the KKK? One of the four lawyers who worked with our illustrious attorney general and former senator from Alabama said Sessions told him he thought the KKK was, “OK until I found out they smoked pot.” Surely you were joking, sir. No?

Read more at High Times

Nobody Likes Marijuana in Schedule I—Not Even Prohibitionists

These days, you don’t have to look very hard to find people unwilling to accept the obvious.

Take climate change, which was recently questioned as a real thing in the opinion pages of the New York Times, despite soaring temperatures; 2017 had the second-warmest spring on record. The hottest-ever was last year, in 2016, the same year Americans elected as president someone who’d gone on record dismissing climate change as a Chinese hoax. To a greater degree, but in much the same vein, you can find, on this very day, people living on earth who insist the earth is flat.

In this same silo, we’d like to place people who believe, honestly, that cannabis belongs in Schedule I of the American Controlled Substances Act. But we’d like to put them in a further circle of deniers, since not even America’s leading prohibitionists think marijuana should be classified as thus.

Read more at High Times

Senators Reintroduce Bill to End Federal Prohibition of Medical Marijuana

With all the fighting going on in Congress, it’s hard to find almost anything for them to agree on nowadays. One of the few things, it seems to be, is ending medical marijuana prohibition.

On Thursday, a bipartisan group including U.S. Sens. Rand Paul (R-KY), Corey Booker (D-NJ), Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY), Mike Lee (R-UT) and Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) reintroduced the CARERS Act with new 2017 branding.

The CARERS Act of 2017 (or, if you’re trying to sound smart, The Compassionate Access, Research Expansion and Respect States Act) basically allows states with medical marijuana to continue doing it, but legally. More importantly, it would allow the Department of Veterans Affairs to recommend it to veterans as a treatment, as well as create some important paths for research.

Read more at High Times

Casualties of War: How Prohibition Affects Education

The devastating impact of the War on Drugs extends to higher education, as students caught with pot face losing out on federal financial aid and often, consequently, on an education. Drug offenses are the only crimes that must be reported on federal student-aid applications, and that’s unlikely to change under a new administration laden with drug warriors.

Christy Billett could be the poster child for exposing the enduring perniciousness of the Drug War’s attack on American college students. Her story also stands as a stark warning about what many students may face under the Trump administration with an Education Department headed by Betsy DeVos and a Justice Department led by Jeff Sessions.

Back in 2000, Billett—then a working-class young woman of 18—was a few courses shy of completing her associate’s degree at DuBois Business College in rural Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, where she was enrolled in a program that would have made her a medical-transcription administrator. But she found herself entrapped in a sting by a friend’s father, a man with cancer who had asked his son to find him a source of marijuana to ease his pain. Billett, who had some pot and occasionally sold some, offered to sell him two ounces, but it turned out he was setting her up. While closing the deal, Billett was arrested and, without an attorney, agreed to make a statement to police. She subsequently hired a lawyer who managed to get the court to change her plea to “no contest,” but the damage was done. A convicted drug felon under Pennsylvania law, when Billett filed a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) in January 2001 to cover her final semester’s tuition, she discovered that she was permanently banned from receiving any federal tuition grants or student loans.

Read more at High Times

Radical Rant: If I Can’t Grow and Buy Pot Without Penalty, It Ain’t Legalization

It’s fascinating to me how different states are approaching the popular idea of marijuana legalization.

Most of the states to tackle it so far have recognized that it is wrong for the government to punish adults who cultivate, buy, sell and consume cannabis for their own personal use. That’s the case in California, Oregon, Alaska, Colorado, Maine and Massachusetts—so far, though, they vary on how many cannabis plants and how much usable marijuana is “personal.”

But some jurisdictions are approaching legalization in a piecemeal fashion that makes no sense to me.

Read more at High Times

China: The Philippines’ Drug War is Good And You Should Support It

China and the United States are locked in a sort of cold war for influence in the Philippines, whose authoritarian, unfiltered strongman of a leader, Rodrigo Duterte, has overseen a gruesomely bloody war on drugs (and has favorably compared himself to Adolf Hitler) since taking office less than a year ago.

Thousands of people have killed since Duterte took power last June—mostly poor people, pedicab operators and drug addicts. They’ve died either willingly, in suicidal shootouts with police, if you believe Duterte and his supporters, or at the hands of government-sanctioned death squads, if you believe international human-rights groups and the families of victims.

These are mere petty details when playing realpolitik. China’s strategy for winning Duterte’s heart is simple: tell the 71-year-old that he’s doing a great job, and that his War on Drugs—deaths and all—deserves your support.

Read more at High Times

Jeff Sessions Intent on Including Medical Pot in His Sinister War on Drugs

Attorney General Jeff Sessions has had all of us worried for a while now. Each sigh of relief seems to quickly turn into a cold sweat.

Medical marijuana, which we thought was safe from the long arm of the feds, got thrown a curve ball with Trump’s “signing statement” on a bill earlier this month, in which the president implied that he would do what he felt like doing when it came to MMJ—regardless of state laws and his previous stances.

Given Sessions’ relentless opposition to medical marijuana ,underscored recently when he said it “has been hyped, maybe too much,” advocates are worried that the administration is planning a full frontal assault on state MMJ programs, 29 in all.

Read more at High Times