Drug Prosecutions at Historic Low under AG Jeff Sessions’ Avowed Crackdown

Despite continuous threats and conniving political moves to crack down on legal weed, Attorney General Jeff Sessions has been stymied by the chaos and ineptitude of the Trump administration, not to mention rational human beings who view his crackdown as a terrible idea.

This combination has resulted in the lowest recorded levels of federal drug prosecutions than any previous administration at this point in their tenure.

According to new data released by the Transactional Records Access Clearinghouse at Syracuse University (TRAC), the feds prosecuted nine percent fewer drug crimes from February to June of this year compared to the same period last year and more than 20 percent fewer than that period five years ago.

Read more at High Times

Weed Finally Decriminalized in New Hampshire

Photo by Jesse Faatz.

The “Live Free or Die” state just became the last and final one in New England to eliminate the possibility of jail time for possession of small amounts of weed.

Republican Governor Chris Sununu signed a bill to remove criminal penalties for possessing up to three-quarters of an ounce of cannabis or up to five grams of hash.

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Torture Victim Seeking U.S. Asylum Faces Deportation for Dropped Pot Charge

Marco Coello was 18 when he was arrested in Caracas Venezuela at a protest against the regime of Nicolás Maduro, successor to the late Hugo Chavez.

Venezuelan police kicked and beat Marco with a golf club, fire extinguisher and tortured him with electric shocks.

After three months, he was released on bail and fled to the United States, where he sought political asylum.

Read more at High Times

Boxing Champion Wilder Charged with Pot Possession

MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — Heavyweight boxing champion Deontay Wilder was charged Wednesday with misdemeanor marijuana possession, but his lawyer says the marijuana found in his car did not belong to him.

Police in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, said in a statement that they arrested Wilder on Wednesday afternoon after they found marijuana in his Cadillac Escalade. Wilder, 31, was initially stopped for a window tint violation. Officers searched the car after smelling marijuana and found a small amount in the vehicle’s console.

Wilder was charged with second-degree marijuana possession, a misdemeanor, and released on $1,000 bond.

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Man Sentenced to 17 Years for Pot Possession Gets Released… Here’s Why

Corey Ladd was 27 years old when the car he was traveling in was pulled over by a New Orleans police officer for a broken brake light. During the ensuing inevitable search, cops found a half ounce of marijuana tucked into the waistband of his pants.

These days, someone in Ladd’s position would receive an $80 fine.

As more states move to legalize marijuana, states where cannabis is still illegal are moving to punish nonviolent marijuana possession with civil penalties akin to a traffic ticket.

Read more at High Times

Rapper Chief Keef Accused of Pot Possession in South Dakota

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) — Chicago rapper Chief Keef has been arrested in South Dakota, accused of drug possession.

The rapper, whose legal name is Keith Cozart, was booked into the Minnehaha County Jail Monday following his arrest at the Sioux Falls Regional Airport. Police say airport security found marijuana in his carry-on bag.

Promoters say Chief Keef performed Sunday at an anti-bullying celebrity basketball event at the University of Sioux Falls.

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Police Issue Annoyed Press Release After Pot Arrest

HAMPSTEAD, N.H. (AP) — A New Hampshire police department has issued a public service announcement with an odd mug shot after a man was arrested with marijuana in his car.

Hampstead police said in a release Monday, “as a public service announcement – it is illegal to possess recreational marijuana in New Hampshire, even if you only ‘smoke it in Massachusetts.’”

WMUR-TV reports the announcement came after the arrest of 27-year-old Selket Taylor, who was pulled over for using his cellphone while driving.

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Setback in State’s Quest to Steal Grandmother’s Home Because Her Son Sold Pot

Elizabeth Young is a 72-year-old widow and former Amtrak employee who lived in a modest brick row house in West Philadelphia beginning in the 1970s. She lived there until 2013, when the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania took it.

You should know Elizabeth Young has not been accused of a crime by the people of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Allegations of committing a crime is the usual precursor to conviction of a crime—which, in turn, is the usual precursor to being punished for a crime.

Crime and [then] Punishment. Simple. That’s how it works. Right?

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Teens Take Responsibility for Weed and Guns—But the Beer Isn’t Theirs

There is always a time when you come face-to-face with a police officer that you start to wonder how long it is going to take before Johnnie or Jeanie Law asks whether you are in possession of any “drugs, weapons or any other illegal contraband,” that they should know about.

Are you kidding?

Of course, the appropriate answer in these types of situations is always, “No,” but there are those times when rattled nerves have a way of evaporating any semblance of common sense, and the whole damn scene just falls apart right there on the side of the road.

Read more at High Times

Homeland Security Chief: We’ll Absolutely Deport People for Marijuana

John Kelly’s tenure as a reasonable person with sound and sane views on marijuana lasted less than 48 hours.

On Sunday, the Homeland Security chief won fans in drug-reform circles with his statement that cannabis is “not a factor” in America’s drug war—not with opiate overdoses killing more people than auto accidents across the country, and certainly not with a multibillion-dollar, legal domestic cannabis industry—and then went a step further, declaring on NBC’s Meet the Press that “the solution is not arresting a lot of users.”

“The solution,” he said, “is a comprehensive drug demand reduction program in the United States that involves every man and woman of goodwill. And then rehabilitation. And then law enforcement. And then getting at the poppy fields and the coca fields in the south.”

Read more at High Times