Police Are Tracking Phone & Web Habits to Snare Drug Crime

When it comes to indiscriminately sweeping up metadata from internet and cellphone users, Australia is the worldwide leader. Police down under have also either been deliberately misleading with why they want all your information—or simply can’t be trusted not to ramp up the War on Drugs when given the opportunity.

Since massive data retention in the name of law and order became de rigueur in 2015—sold to the public as a vital tool to protect national security and fight terrorism—Australian police have vacuumed up more metadata per capita than counterparts in the U.S., U.K. and Canada.

All data, like IP addresses visited and location information for phones, must be retained for at least two years—and is accessible without a warrant. But more data is available with a judge’s permission, and so Australian magistrates have duly issued more warrants authorizing data collection than their allies in the war on terror.

Read more at High Times

DEA and Justice Department at Odds on Medical Pot Research

Photo by Justin Cannabis.

A year ago, the DEA began accepting applications to grow more marijuana for research. They now have 25 proposals to consider, but they need the Department of Justice (DOJ) to sign-off in order to move forward.

So, of course, Jeff Sessions is ignoring them. Actually, he’s blocking them.

Read more at High Times

Please Applaud This Kansas Teen Using Cannabis Legalization to Run for Governor

Listen. It’s been a rough few days. There are bad things happening in America, mostly (OK, pretty much entirely!) on one side, the side that likes to march around at night with torches and deny the personhood of millions of people, the side that has copies of The Turner Diaries strategically scattered around the house.

So! Let’s talk about Jack Bergeson, the adorably ambitious and entirely positive teenager from Kansas, who’s running for governor—on a platform that includes raising the minimum wage, higher salaries for teachers, no tax increases on families making less than $60,000 a year—and, the reason why we’re here, marijuana legalization.

As the Kansas City Star and other outlets have reported, Jack Bergeson is 16 years old and lives in Wichita, Kansas, where he’s a junior in high school and works part-time in his family’s restaurant. (Fizz Burgers and Bottles, at 7718 E. 37th Street N. The next time we’re in Wichita, we’re stopping in for a meal.)

Read more at High Times

Ohio Finds Public University Willing to Lab Test Medical Pot

Ohio state law requires that for the first year of its medical marijuana program, a quality testing lab must be operated by a public institution of higher education, located within the state, with the resources to operate a lab. After a year of the program, private labs can be licensed.

At least one public university in Ohio is willing to test medical marijuana, for quality purposes, according to CCV Research. This was disclosed in an effort to squash concerns that a lack of labs could delay the entire medical marijuana program.

CCV Research, which understand the “monumental task of implementing an entire cannabis regulatory framework, and the difficulties faced while on-boarding an existing industry into legal compliance,” would not name the college, but announced that it meets the criteria in the state’s medical marijuana program regulations, that demands a public college or university host a laboratory to monitor the quality of plants and products sold to Ohioans.

Read more at High Times

How Marijuana Could End Federalism (and Why That Could Be Good)

Photo by Vortex Farmacy.

Over the two centuries and change that the experiment we know as the American republican has been conducted, the center of power has not been static.

At first, the most powerful governments in the country were located in the states. This changed after sitting presidents found themselves reduced to begging for the men and materiel needed to wage wars.

Read more at High Times

West Virginia Medical Marijuana Program Board Set to Meet

CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) — A board that will help develop a medical marijuana program in West Virginia is holding its first meeting.

The advisory board is set to meet Wednesday at the University of Charleston. Among the topics for discussion is a work plan for the program’s first year. The meeting is open to the public and will include a comment period.

Gov. Jim Justice signed a law April 19 making West Virginia the 29th state to allow the use of marijuana for certain medical conditions.

Read more at High Times

Private Sector Banks Putting the Squeeze on Uruguay’s Legal Marijuana Industry

On July 19, Uruguay started selling legal weed in pharmacies—making it the world’s first state-run marijuana marketplace with the government involved in the entire chain of movement from cultivation to purchase.

The problem however is that, at $1.30 per gram, the country has already run out of weed and it’s program has only been operating for less than a month.

From the very first day when sales started, there were shortages; some pharmacies were cleaned out before closing time.

Read more at High Times

How New York Voters Can End Prohibition

As a libertarian, these words really hit a nerve with me…

We have a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity in New York to peacefully seize control of our government this November 7.

Cannabis legalization advocate Jerome Dewald pulled no punches when describing the opportunity we have before us to end cannabis prohibition in the state of New York.

Read more at High Times