NYPD: No Arrests If You Call 911 During Drug Overdose

As the country’s opioid epidemic worsens, the New York Police Department is undertaking a campaign to encourage people to report overdoses.

The NYPD public service campaign aims to communicate to drug users, and witnesses, that they won’t be arrested if they call 911 in the event of a drug or alcohol overdose emergency.

“This campaign will help New Yorkers understand the protections of the Good Samaritan law for those suffering from an overdose or calling to help someone in need,” Police Commissioner James P. O’Neill told WNBC. “This is about saving lives. And this campaign will do just that.”

Read more at High Times

How to Cut Down on Traffic Stops and Save Lives: Legalize Weed

Studies are showing that states with legalized weed are experiencing a sharp decline in the number of traffic stops and searches by state police.

This is extremely pertinent considering that for some people, interaction with police officers can end in death, followed by impunity for the murderous cops.

The latest in the growing list of these racist outrages is Philando Castile, pulled over for no apparent reason, then shot and killed (with his seatbelt on) while calmly reaching for his ID after having informed the officer that he was carrying a legally registered firearm.

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As Marijuana Comes Out of Black Market, Regulators Face Scrutiny

BY KRISTEN WYATT

ASSOCIATED PRESS

DENVER (AP) — Take a black-market business that relies on cash. Move the business out of the shadows by giving it government oversight. Hire new regulators to keep watch on the business, all without any experience regulating a brand-new industry.

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Radical Rant: Castile’s ‘Audacity to Smoke Marijuana’ Got Him Killed

Officer Jeronimo Yanez in Minnesota was acquitted of all charges related to his point-blank shooting of motorist Philando Castile, a young black man whose execution was streamed live by his girlfriend sitting beside him while her young daughter was in the back seat.

Now, after the trial, the police dashcam footage and the initial investigators’ interviews with Castile and his two police union lawyers have been released, revealing the shocking details that Yanez initially feared for his life—not because Castile was a self-identified lawfully-permitted concealed-carry gun owner—but because Yanez could smell marijuana coming from Castile’s car.

“As I get up to the car I’m hit with an odor of burning marijuana,” Yanez told Special Agents Doug Henning and Christopher Olsen of the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension. “And I know it’s already been smoked, and I’ve been around, uh, through my training, I’ve been around burnt marijuana and, uh, as a police officer, I’ve been around burnt marijuana and, uh, fresh marijuana. I smelled burnt marijuana. And then, I see a female child in the back. And then I see a front seat passenger, adult female, uh, in the front seat.”

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What Happens If I’m Charged with a Marijuana DUI?

While there are some major differences in the way police handle cannabis-impaired driving and drunk driving, most court systems hand down similar consequences for both offenses. If the court convicts you for driving while under the influence of marijuana, you can expect the ramifications to include a license suspension, a drug and alcohol awareness class, fines, probation and even jail time.

However, the way the prosecution will build their case against you is very different with stoned driving. They cannot simply conduct a breath test after pulling you over to determine if you used cannabis recently.

For example, in Washington State, police have two options for proving a driver is under the influence of marijuana. These options are:

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Touch Drugs, Go to Prison: Cops Use DNA to Bust Alleged Dealer

Last October, police in Milton Keynes, a district just north of London, were searching in the bushes along one of the area’s many bike and pedestrian paths. 

In one bush, they found a package containing 15.82 grams of cocaine and 10.3 grams of heroin.

Two months later, police arrested Darren Levy. Last week, the 35-year old was sentenced to five years in jail for possession with intent to distribute—despite not being anywhere near the drugs in question.

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Cannabis at Issue in Philando Castile Case—Yet Again

Protests broke out in Minnesota’s Twin Cities last Friday night, after the acquittal of a police officer in the notorious slaying of black motorist Philando Castile—a St. Paul school cafeteria worker, who was 32, at the time of his death.

As I write, the first arrests are taking place, as thousands of demonstrators attempt to shut down Interstate 94. Black Lives Matter protesters are again mobilizing in cities across the country.

The July 2016 shooting was particularly egregious.

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Biggest Drug War Victory? Courts, Governors Tiring of Asset Forfeiture

If cops weren’t allowed to seize your property without a trial—and, in many cases, without even accusing you of a crime—law enforcement in America would be near unrecognizable. For instance, the DEA would be $4 billion poorer.

As the Justice Department’s inspector general noted in March, DEA agents have seized $4 billion in cash over the last decade from travelers under the pretext of drug-related asset forfeiture. In more than 81 percent of the cases reviewed, there were no criminal charges filed, as Reason reported.

Investigations often began after innocuous acts that are not criminal: purchasing a last-minute or one-way ticket, traveling without checked luggage, or flying to a “known source city for drug trafficking.” Conveniently, that would include nearly every major city in America, according to federal drug agents.

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Boxing Champion Wilder Charged with Pot Possession

MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — Heavyweight boxing champion Deontay Wilder was charged Wednesday with misdemeanor marijuana possession, but his lawyer says the marijuana found in his car did not belong to him.

Police in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, said in a statement that they arrested Wilder on Wednesday afternoon after they found marijuana in his Cadillac Escalade. Wilder, 31, was initially stopped for a window tint violation. Officers searched the car after smelling marijuana and found a small amount in the vehicle’s console.

Wilder was charged with second-degree marijuana possession, a misdemeanor, and released on $1,000 bond.

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How the Feds Are Going After Fentanyl Suppliers

Like everything else it touches, the internet has revolutionized drug dealing. Anyone with an internet connection can buy enough black-market fentanyl to kill off a small town—including federal law enforcement, whose strategy for stemming the flow of the killer opioid into the United States and slowing the tide of fatal overdoses is doing just that.

But since there are many, many more fentanyl buyers and sellers than there are police, it’s slow, slow going.

Newsweek brings us the story of a recent bust of an Ohio couple, who are accused of buying fentanyl on dark web drug marketplaces and redistributing it around the country. Since May, a federal task force has been making undercover buys from websites offering such deals as “100mg of Fentanyl HCL 98% purity $105+35 for Express-1 days shipping,” and hoping that some fentanyl reseller would be brazen (or dumb) enough to leave a sufficient trail for cops to follow and be found out.

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