DEA and Justice Department at Odds on Medical Pot Research

Photo by Justin Cannabis.

A year ago, the DEA began accepting applications to grow more marijuana for research. They now have 25 proposals to consider, but they need the Department of Justice (DOJ) to sign-off in order to move forward.

So, of course, Jeff Sessions is ignoring them. Actually, he’s blocking them.

Read more at High Times

Please Applaud This Kansas Teen Using Cannabis Legalization to Run for Governor

Listen. It’s been a rough few days. There are bad things happening in America, mostly (OK, pretty much entirely!) on one side, the side that likes to march around at night with torches and deny the personhood of millions of people, the side that has copies of The Turner Diaries strategically scattered around the house.

So! Let’s talk about Jack Bergeson, the adorably ambitious and entirely positive teenager from Kansas, who’s running for governor—on a platform that includes raising the minimum wage, higher salaries for teachers, no tax increases on families making less than $60,000 a year—and, the reason why we’re here, marijuana legalization.

As the Kansas City Star and other outlets have reported, Jack Bergeson is 16 years old and lives in Wichita, Kansas, where he’s a junior in high school and works part-time in his family’s restaurant. (Fizz Burgers and Bottles, at 7718 E. 37th Street N. The next time we’re in Wichita, we’re stopping in for a meal.)

Read more at High Times

VA Studies Find Medical Pot Good for Nerve Pain

A recent research review found that medical marijuana may be effective at reducing chronic nerve pain, known as neuropathy, common among diabetes sufferers.

Dr. Sachin Patel of the Vanderbilt Psychiatric Hospital in Nashville said the findings on MMJ and neuropathy “fit generally well with what we know.”

In the second research review, both of which were commissioned by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, researchers came up with less evidence that cannabis helps treat other types of pain or the effects of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

Read more at High Times

Ohio Finds Public University Willing to Lab Test Medical Pot

Ohio state law requires that for the first year of its medical marijuana program, a quality testing lab must be operated by a public institution of higher education, located within the state, with the resources to operate a lab. After a year of the program, private labs can be licensed.

At least one public university in Ohio is willing to test medical marijuana, for quality purposes, according to CCV Research. This was disclosed in an effort to squash concerns that a lack of labs could delay the entire medical marijuana program.

CCV Research, which understand the “monumental task of implementing an entire cannabis regulatory framework, and the difficulties faced while on-boarding an existing industry into legal compliance,” would not name the college, but announced that it meets the criteria in the state’s medical marijuana program regulations, that demands a public college or university host a laboratory to monitor the quality of plants and products sold to Ohioans.

Read more at High Times

West Virginia Medical Marijuana Program Board Set to Meet

CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) — A board that will help develop a medical marijuana program in West Virginia is holding its first meeting.

The advisory board is set to meet Wednesday at the University of Charleston. Among the topics for discussion is a work plan for the program’s first year. The meeting is open to the public and will include a comment period.

Gov. Jim Justice signed a law April 19 making West Virginia the 29th state to allow the use of marijuana for certain medical conditions.

Read more at High Times

NBA Commissioner Says He’s Open to Medical Pot

With states all across the nation climbing out of the pit of pot prohibition, it should come as no surprise that professional sports leagues are now starting to discuss the possibility of revising their drug policies.

Although the majority of the debate is, so far, focused on how cannabis medicine might be used as an alternative to opioid medications for players in the NFL, it was recently revealed that the arena of professional basketball is, too, giving this treatment option some consideration.

NBA Commissioner Adam Silver, who has not exactly been in support of changing the NBA’s drug policy with respect to marijuana, is apparently loosening his stance on the concept of players using the herb as a substitute to dangerous prescription drugs.

Read more at High Times

Modest Victories for Defense in Case against Med-West Cannabis Company

In a case being watched by both the cannabis and legal communities nationwide, attorney Jessica McElfresh and her legal team scored two modest victories last week.

In a pre-trial hearing in San Diego Superior Court, Judge Laura W. Halgren ordered the return of McElfresh’s seized medical records and set a schedule for the attorneys in the case to file further briefs.

The major issue of the briefs requested by the judge is how the long-established concept of attorney-client privilege applies in this case. McElfresh had worked with hundreds of clients during her seven years practicing cannabis law. The current lawyers for many of those clients have expressed to Judge Halgren their claim that attorney-client privilege applies to paper and electronic files seized during a search of McElfresh’s home and office.

Read more at High Times

Hawaii Braces for Surge in Medical Marijuana Patients

HONOLULU (AP) — The Hawaii Department of Health is preparing for a surge of patients signing up for the state’s medical cannabis registry, as two medical marijuana dispensaries in the state are officially open for business.

Hawaii News Now reports more than 18,000 patients have joined the state’s medical cannabis registry.

About 38 percent of the patients reside on the Big Island, while 29 percent live on Oahu.

Read more at High Times

Can Legal Weed Rescue West Virginia?

When a bill was introduced in West Virginia to legalize medical marijuana this past spring, MMJ patients were pleased and so were some Republican politicians who are not normally known for such displays of support.

“I think we all know someone who has benefited from some application of marijuana or certainly could benefit based on the research that’s available today,” said John Shott, West Virginia’s Republican Chairman of the Judiciary Committee.

Another governmental organization that also perked up its collective ears was the West Virginia Center on Budget and Policy.

Read more at High Times