Pot Matters: Hemp Policy and Legislative Update

Later this week, Congressman James Comer (R-KY) will introduce the Industrial Hemp Farming Act, federal legislation that would “essentially remove hemp from the Controlled Substances Act, allowing industrial cultivation of the plant,” a key objective of the National Hemp Association (NHA). The bill will also set a THC limit and provide for state regulation of the hemp industry and related companies.

Vote Hemp has also been working with Congress to refine the proposed legislation, successfully advocating for a provision to include Native American tribes and influencing a key compromise allowing research on hemp with an upper limit of 0.6 percent THC. (The designated THC threshold in hemp regulations has an impact on the cost of cultivation and research.)

On his website, Comer is proud of his past support for hemp, recalling that as Kentucky’s Commissioner of Agriculture in 2011, he “promoted rural economic development by spearheading the successful effort to legalize industrial hemp and developed new branding initiatives for Kentucky farmers.”

Read more at High Times

Growing Pot is Your Patriotic Duty

Clammy mists clung bitterly to the rolling hills of a brisk autumn morning, but the panting grower ignored them as he hurried on. His employer, one of the top cannabis growers in the region, would be devastated by the news the man so hurriedly carried that crisp fall morning, but he was also a man who should not be kept waiting. In an unfortunate turn of events, this dutiful gardener had learned that an unaccounted male plant had popped off, pollinating an entire field of sinsemilla in the process. This grower didn’t think his employer would be pleased.

It’s a scene that could have occurred countless times in the U.S., in any state or during any year. This particular occasion, however, would prove historic. Indeed, modern historians know about the incident because of the personal diary of the man’s employer, a very imminent farmer of his time, written in 1765: the diary of George Washington.

These days, standard history textbooks no longer mention that the man who would go on to become the first president of the United States began his career as a “gentleman” farmer of some of Virginia Colony’s top cash crops, including cannabis. The fact is hardly controversial; Washington wrote extensively about his cannabis crop in his own handwriting – especially in the period before the Revolutionary War when his career was primarily focused on cash crop agriculture. The entry dated Aug. 7, 1765, in which the future president bemoans the fact that he began to “separate the male and female plants… rather too late” has been the focus of much debate.

Read more at Cannabis Now

Kentucky Lawmaker Wants Terminally Ill Patients to Have Pot

Kentucky lawmakers are back at the drawing board once again in hopes of getting the legislative grind to finally get on board with a proposal to legalize medical marijuana.

But the debate has become so convoluted that they are now fighting for crumbs.

According to a report from the Courier-Journal, state Senator Morgan McGarvey of Louisville is on the verge of introducing a proposal aimed at legalizing a medical marijuana program. Unfortunately, the measure is not at all comprehensive, as it seeks to give exclusive access to patients at the end of their lives.

Read more at High Times

Lawsuit Challenges Kentucky’s Medical Marijuana Ban

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — Kentucky’s criminal ban on medical marijuana is being challenged in a lawsuit that says its use could help combat the state’s opioid addiction woes.

The suit, filed Wednesday in Franklin County Circuit Court in Frankfort, lists three plaintiffs who have used medical marijuana to help ease health problems.

The suit says the medical marijuana ban violates constitutional privacy rights.

Read more at High Times

‘Godfather of Grass’ Pleads Not Guilty in Federal Court

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — A 73-year-old drug suspect known as the “Godfather of Grass” has made his first appearance in federal court in Louisville since his December arrest in Canada after eight years on the run.

The Courier-Journal reports John Robert “Johnny” Boone told U.S. Magistrate Judge Colin Lindsay on Wednesday that he understood his rights, and his lawyer entered a not guilty plea for him.

Boone was imprisoned after a conviction in the 1980s. Prosecutors said he had 29 farms in Minnesota, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, Nebraska, Missouri, Kansas and Wisconsin. Prosecutors said he led a network nicknamed the “Cornbread Mafia.”

Read more at High Times

America’s Hemp CBD Crop Arrives!

A gushing well of curative, CBD-rich hemp oil in Kentucky is bursting through federal prohibition.

Ninety-year-olds Glenna and Jake Graves sit in the living room of their family farmhouse in Lexington, Kentucky, a home they’ve built over 70 years together, surrounded by family who watch Glenna’s hands shake with the tremors of advanced age

“For the last 30 years or so, she’s had really bad tremors,” her son Andy Graves, 58, says. “Her hands shake all the time. In fact, she couldn’t hold a cup of water still if she tried.”

Read more at Cannabis Now

Kentucky Destroys Hemp Containing Too Much THC

There is a distinct possibility that residents in the northern part of the Bluegrass State have smelled something that resembles marijuana wafting through the air over the past few weeks. The Kentucky Department of Agriculture says it recently burned a significant amount of commercial hemp because it contained too much of the psychoactive compound THC.

Last Thursday, around 100 pounds of hemp was destroyed at a facility in Louisville because testing showed its THC levels were higher than what the federal government will allow without sending in a legion of DEA agents to tear down the whole scene.

Hemp is often considered marijuana’s more conservative cousin. While it does contain small amounts of THC, there is simply not enough of the compound present—no matter how much a person might smoke—to produce the stoned effects commonly associated with the use of marijuana.

Read more at High Times