Can Topical Cannabis Heal Wounds?

Photo by Justin Cannabis.

With vaping and edibles getting so much attention these days, let us not forget about the value and benefits of topical cannabis, like balms, lotions, oils and salves, that are showing remarkable results in healing skin wounds and abrasions, as well as easing muscular pain.

The cannabis plant contains over 90 unique chemicals, known as cannabinoids, with THC being the primary and best-known compound for obvious reasons, cannabidiol (CBD) is now recognized as the second compound of significance.

Read more at High Times

Feds to Study Curbing Opioid Epidemic with Medical Pot

The underbelly of the capitalist beast that is the United States government is working to get to the bottom of the claims that have surfaced over the past couple of years, suggesting that medical marijuana is effective at reducing opioid consumption in adults suffering from chronic pain.

It was revealed last week that the National Institutes of Health recently awarded a $3.8 million grant to the scientific minds at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Health System to conduct a five-year investigation to determine whether cannabis medicine could be used as an alternative to prescription painkillers.

This is the first time Uncle Sam has ever coughed up a single cent to delve deeper into an increasing body of evidence pointing to cannabis as the trapdoor out of the opioid epidemic.

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How Marijuana Can Help Treat Addictions to Opioids, Other Rx Drugs and Alcohol

Photo by Javier Hasse. 

This article was originally published on Benzinga, and adapted exclusively for HIGH TIMES.

People often talk about marijuana as an alternative to opioids and as a treatment for numerous addictions like alcohol and tobacco. But, like most praises (and condemnations) of weed, these claims are frequently based on hearsay rather than on actual science or quantitative evidence.

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Study Shows Nearly Half of CBD Users Stop Taking Traditional Meds

A new survey, the largest to date, on cannabidiol (CBD) suggests that a growing number of patients are finding more relief from CBD than from traditional pharmaceuticals and they’re acting on this good news—especially the women.

Conducted by the Brightfield Group and HelloMD and covering 2,400 of HelloMD’s community of 150,000 members, the survey found that 55 percent of CBD users were women, while men preferred THC-dominant products.

The most common reasons people used CBD, according to Dr. Perry Solomon, the chief medical officer of HelloMD, were to treat insomnia, depression, anxiety and joint pain.

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Data Shows the Typical MMJ Consumer Is Upscale, Insured and Physician-Diagnosed

This article was originally published on Benzinga and adapted exclusively for HIGH TIMES.

With cannabis legalization across multiple states in the U.S. and other countries around the world, there’s been an explosion of research firms looking into the industry. ArcView Market Research became famous for its market-size predictions, Viridian Capital Advisors acquired notoriety for its Cannabis Deal Tracker and Cannabis Stock Index, and New Frontier Data gained a reputation for its extensive (collaborative) reports.

However, few analysts seem to have focused on the consumer-level to the extent that market researchers usually do in other industries. At least, that was the case until not too long ago, when Consumer Research Around Cannabis (CRAC) emerged, claiming to be “the only national research firm providing local consumer-level data for the emerging cannabis market.”

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First Walk-In Medical Marijuana Clinics Come to Florida

Medical marijuana has not been easy for Florida, despite the fact that fully 71 percent of the state’s population voted to approve it.

Florida’s MMJ laws, among of the most restrictive in the country, does not even allow for smoking it.

But have those 71 percenters in the Sunshine State given up? Hell no.

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From Great Smell to… Medical Benefits? The Truth about Terpenes

Photo by Jesse Faatz.

A new bar in Downtown Los Angeles is making cocktails spiked with terpenes that are also found in cannabis. There’s nothing wrong with adding an extra terp-kick to your drink, but advertising the terpene’s cancer benefits is a whole separate ball game. Is it any help that this new spot is called Prank Bar?

Prank Bar makes cocktails, such as the “Mon Frere,” a mix of Plymouth Gin Cocchi Americano, limonene terpenes and Regan’s Orange Bitter (I’m no mixologist, but isn’t it redundant to add limonene to a drink that already has orange bitters?), and their limonene-packed “Anti-Inflammatory” ambrosia. These drinks probably carry a powerful aroma, but don’t expect them to cure you of depression or cancer.

Read more at High Times

Marijuana Could Help Treat Alzheimer’s: Here’s How It Would Work

This article was originally published on Benzinga and adapted exclusively for HIGH TIMES.

You’ve probably heard this before.

As early as 2008, several reports, including one published in the journal Molecular Pharmaceutics, began proposing various therapeutic pathways by which cannabinoids could treat Alzheimer’s Disease patients, but none were proven.

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Does the ‘Stoned Ape’ Theory Explain Human Evolution?

Ethnobotanist and psychedelics advocate, Terence McKenna, wrote a book called Food of the Gods, which is an exploration of humans’ symbiotic relationships with plants and chemicals—now and in pre-historic societies.

McKenna came up with an interesting, albeit controversial theory, which was this: what enabled Homo erectus (our ancestors from 1.8 million years ago) to evolve into Homo sapiens (us now) had to do with their encounters with magic mushrooms and psilocybin, the psychedelic compound within them.

McKenna called this the “Stoned Ape Hypothesis” and posited that psilocybin caused the primitive brain’s information-processing capabilities to rapidly reorganize, which in turn kick-started an evolution of awareness that led to the early art, language and technology found in Homo sapiens’ archeological records.

Read more at High Times