California Businessman Believes the Smell of Marijuana Hurts Wine Grapes

Robert “Pat” Patrick is the CEO of the local chamber of commerce in Lodi, California, a stretch of the state’s agricultural heartland that, in recent years, has made a name for itself as a nascent winemaking region.

It’ll never be Napa or Sonoma, but brother, if you’ve ever taken a sip of red wine and been greeted by a bold flavor explosion—like drinking a jam sandwich, made by an overcompensating Guy Fieri, borrowing Sam Elliott’s boots right after a 100-mile horseback ride through a tobacco juice swamp—you know the pleasures of a Lodi Zinfandel.

Grapes are a big deal here—in 2015, Lodi was Wine Enthusiast magazine’s “Wine Region of the Year”!—so Patrick will predictably take unkindly to anything threatening the area’s 110,000 acres of vineyards. Like marijuana fields, the smell of which, according to Patrick, can permeate the skin of a wine grape and render it less valuable.

Read more at High Times

Growers Say Ohio’s Tight Timeline Could Delay 1st Pot Crop

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Officials in Ohio say they don’t expect to issue the state’s first medical marijuana cultivator licenses until around November, at least a month later than growers expected.

The Ohio Department of Commerce announced the timetable Thursday.

It drew immediate concern from the National Cannabis Industry Association of Ohio. The association had anticipated growers having about a year before the September 2018 deadline to ramp up their operations and produce their first crop.

Read more at High Times

Here’s the Deal with Pot in North Korea

Photo by Vortex Farmacy.

In 1962, American soldier Allen Abshier, stationed in South Korea, defected to the ironically-named Democratic People’s Republic of Korea—AKA (the completely non-democratic) North Korea—in order to avoid court-martial charges, after having been caught smoking marijuana five or six times. Presumably, he was allowed to smoke freely in the country where he sought asylum.

It is surprising that a regime as diabolically punishing as the one that arrested and detained college student Otto Warmbier, for allegedly stealing a poster from his hotel room while on vacation, would be so open about cannabis. (Tragically, after 17 months in prison, Otto Warmbier succumbed to injuries sustained in captivity and died a few days after his release.)

Read more at High Times

BRINGING SUSTAINABILITY TO YOUR STASH: Understanding How to Keep Cannabis Cultivation Green

Contrary to popular belief, cannabis culture isn’t just about the consumption and effects of marijuana and its byproducts, but rather about the cultivation, science and environment of the industry. However, many inside the cannabis world still do not realize the environmental impacts of cannabis cultivation and how to bring sustainability into their own stash. Hakuna Supply, in conjunction with DOPE Magazine, researched this subject to bring our readers information on the environmental impacts of cannabis, as well as ways for growers, consumers and advocates to help reduce them.

Let’s bring it back to November 8, 2016, when 4 states passed the recreational use of cannabis, raising the total number of rec states to 8, meaning “20% of the U.S. population lives in a state where it is legal for people aged 21 and over to buy marijuana for recreational use” (Trends eMagazine Feb 2017). This effectively created a new industry in the United States that rivals some of the largest corporations. For example, revenue sales in Colorado have reached almost $1 billion, which is equal to some of the largest farming commodities in the state. As the cannabis industry continues to grow and amass profits, the amount of cannabis grown will increase, as well.

So, what does this have to do with the environment? Let’s first look at cannabis cultivation  in general. To create a potent, high-demand product, a grower will require “hot temperatures, intense light, highly fertile soil, and large volumes of water” (Ashworth 2017). These factors can produce excessive amounts of greenhouse gas emissions. It has even been estimated by the Marijuana Policy Group that legal & illegal indoor grow operations account for 1% of the average energy usage in the U.S. Additionally, illegal grow operations often generate their power off the grid to avoid raising red flags. To create enough energy to power their lights, these illegal growers rely on generators, which often “produce more than three times the CO2 of facilities powered by the grid” (Ashworth 2017). The potential impacts on air quality is another rising concern. As reported by J. W. Martyny in the “Potential Exposures Associated with Indoor Marijuana Growing Operations,” a sampling carried out in conjunction with law enforcement raids on illicit grow operations have measured concentrations of highly reactive organic compounds. These findings present a pressing issue, as experts predict the consumption and cultivation of cannabis to steadily increase until 2050.

Read more at Dope Magazine