The Latest: Nevada Says State Determined to Meet July 1 Deadline

CARSON CITY, Nev. (AP) — The Latest on the legal battle over the licensing of marijuana businesses necessary for existing medical dispensaries to begin selling pot for recreational use on July 1 (all times local, PDT):

5:15 p.m.

Nevada’s marijuana regulators remain determined to launch the state’s first sales of recreational pot at existing medical dispensaries on July 1. But they acknowledge they aren’t sure that will happen after a judge extended a temporary order Tuesday preventing the state from issuing distribution licenses to existing marijuana businesses.

Read more at High Times

Sessions Makes Bizarre Plea in Washington Post to Go Along with His Drug War

Oh, Attorney General Jeff Sessions, why do you say such things? Are you willfully ignorant or were you born in the wrong century?

Even with so much happening in and around the White House these days, there are a few things in your background that might shed light on your out of touch, fact-challenged, bigoted screed and they include: your white supremacist ties, racist and homophobic legislative voting record and a history of opposing voting rights, to highlights just a few.

And wasn’t there something about the KKK? One of the four lawyers who worked with our illustrious attorney general and former senator from Alabama said Sessions told him he thought the KKK was, “OK until I found out they smoked pot.” Surely you were joking, sir. No?

Read more at High Times

MA Guts Pot Industry Protections for People of Color

When Massachusetts’ voters passed Question 4 last November it included clear language for diversity and inclusion in the forthcoming legal cannabis industry. Now lawmakers and activists are furious that the state’s omnibus cannabis bill does not match the vision of the drafters or will of the voters.

As the discussion around inclusion in the cannabis industry for those communities most affected by the War on Drugs has snowballed over the last couple years, Massachusetts was one of the places industry observers were pointing to as an example of concrete steps being made in that direction. The issue has picked up major steam at the municipal level in places like Oakland, California, but Massachusetts’ actions at the state level would set a high bar for the future.

But now things have gone sideways, and everyone from the bill’s authors to the Boston City Council is up in arms at the bravado of Beacon Hill’s actions — just down the street from the last team in Major League Baseball to integrate black players.

Read more at Cannabis Now

How Canada and Uruguay Are Challenging International Pot Laws

Photo by Vortex Farmacy. 

President Donald Trump and his Canadian counterpart, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, have more in common than a Mad Men-level iron grip. Both world leaders have proven willing to buck the international order and be North American mavericks: Trump, on climate change; Trudeau, on legalizing weed.

On June 1, Trump announced the United States’ impending exit from the Paris Climate Agreement, a move the New York Times called a “remarkable rebuke” to the rest of the world, as well as an exercise in pure denial. (Meanwhile, on Monday, as a record-setting deadly heatwave descended on most of the western United States, Energy Secretary Rick Perry went on CNBC to deny any link between carbon emissions and an undeniable, drastic shift in temperatures.)

Read more at High Times

Nobody Likes Marijuana in Schedule I—Not Even Prohibitionists

These days, you don’t have to look very hard to find people unwilling to accept the obvious.

Take climate change, which was recently questioned as a real thing in the opinion pages of the New York Times, despite soaring temperatures; 2017 had the second-warmest spring on record. The hottest-ever was last year, in 2016, the same year Americans elected as president someone who’d gone on record dismissing climate change as a Chinese hoax. To a greater degree, but in much the same vein, you can find, on this very day, people living on earth who insist the earth is flat.

In this same silo, we’d like to place people who believe, honestly, that cannabis belongs in Schedule I of the American Controlled Substances Act. But we’d like to put them in a further circle of deniers, since not even America’s leading prohibitionists think marijuana should be classified as thus.

Read more at High Times

Cannabis at Issue in Philando Castile Case—Yet Again

Protests broke out in Minnesota’s Twin Cities last Friday night, after the acquittal of a police officer in the notorious slaying of black motorist Philando Castile—a St. Paul school cafeteria worker, who was 32, at the time of his death.

As I write, the first arrests are taking place, as thousands of demonstrators attempt to shut down Interstate 94. Black Lives Matter protesters are again mobilizing in cities across the country.

The July 2016 shooting was particularly egregious.

Read more at High Times

Judge Mulling Nevada Bid for Recreational Pot Sales July 1

BY SCOTT SONNER

ASSOCIATED PRESS

CARSON CITY, Nev. (AP) — Nevada’s marijuana regulators are working furiously to launch recreational sales on July 1, a fast-approaching deadline that could hinge on a court deciding whether the powerful liquor industry should be guaranteed a piece of the pot pie before tourists and residents can light up.

Read more at High Times

Vermont Legalization Deal Likely This Week

 

Despite a disappointing gubernatorial veto, Vermont’s historic legalization bill could still move forward — this week.

Vermont came within a stroke of Gov. Rick Scott’s pen of becoming the first state to legalize marijuana through the regular old legislative process, rather than put the hard and dirty work to voters.

Read more at Cannabis Now

Biggest Drug War Victory? Courts, Governors Tiring of Asset Forfeiture

If cops weren’t allowed to seize your property without a trial—and, in many cases, without even accusing you of a crime—law enforcement in America would be near unrecognizable. For instance, the DEA would be $4 billion poorer.

As the Justice Department’s inspector general noted in March, DEA agents have seized $4 billion in cash over the last decade from travelers under the pretext of drug-related asset forfeiture. In more than 81 percent of the cases reviewed, there were no criminal charges filed, as Reason reported.

Investigations often began after innocuous acts that are not criminal: purchasing a last-minute or one-way ticket, traveling without checked luggage, or flying to a “known source city for drug trafficking.” Conveniently, that would include nearly every major city in America, according to federal drug agents.

Read more at High Times