As Marijuana Comes Out of Black Market, Regulators Face Scrutiny

BY KRISTEN WYATT

ASSOCIATED PRESS

DENVER (AP) — Take a black-market business that relies on cash. Move the business out of the shadows by giving it government oversight. Hire new regulators to keep watch on the business, all without any experience regulating a brand-new industry.

Read more at High Times

Cali May Allow County Fair Vendors To Sell Pot Alongside Cotton Candy

Photo by Justin Cannabis.

Doesn’t that sound like fun? County fairs are usually known for their cherry pie baking competitions or hot dog eating contests, but leave it to California to ponder allowing cannabis booths alongside the corn dogs and cotton candy.

According to the Golden State’s recently passed Senate Bill 94 which regulates adult-use marijuana and is attached to California’s budget, weed companies can apply for a temporary licenses to sell their products at fairgrounds.

Read more at High Times

The Latest: Nevada Says State Determined to Meet July 1 Deadline

CARSON CITY, Nev. (AP) — The Latest on the legal battle over the licensing of marijuana businesses necessary for existing medical dispensaries to begin selling pot for recreational use on July 1 (all times local, PDT):

5:15 p.m.

Nevada’s marijuana regulators remain determined to launch the state’s first sales of recreational pot at existing medical dispensaries on July 1. But they acknowledge they aren’t sure that will happen after a judge extended a temporary order Tuesday preventing the state from issuing distribution licenses to existing marijuana businesses.

Read more at High Times

How Canada and Uruguay Are Challenging International Pot Laws

Photo by Vortex Farmacy. 

President Donald Trump and his Canadian counterpart, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, have more in common than a Mad Men-level iron grip. Both world leaders have proven willing to buck the international order and be North American mavericks: Trump, on climate change; Trudeau, on legalizing weed.

On June 1, Trump announced the United States’ impending exit from the Paris Climate Agreement, a move the New York Times called a “remarkable rebuke” to the rest of the world, as well as an exercise in pure denial. (Meanwhile, on Monday, as a record-setting deadly heatwave descended on most of the western United States, Energy Secretary Rick Perry went on CNBC to deny any link between carbon emissions and an undeniable, drastic shift in temperatures.)

Read more at High Times

What Happens If I’m Charged with a Marijuana DUI?

While there are some major differences in the way police handle cannabis-impaired driving and drunk driving, most court systems hand down similar consequences for both offenses. If the court convicts you for driving while under the influence of marijuana, you can expect the ramifications to include a license suspension, a drug and alcohol awareness class, fines, probation and even jail time.

However, the way the prosecution will build their case against you is very different with stoned driving. They cannot simply conduct a breath test after pulling you over to determine if you used cannabis recently.

For example, in Washington State, police have two options for proving a driver is under the influence of marijuana. These options are:

Read more at High Times

Nobody Likes Marijuana in Schedule I—Not Even Prohibitionists

These days, you don’t have to look very hard to find people unwilling to accept the obvious.

Take climate change, which was recently questioned as a real thing in the opinion pages of the New York Times, despite soaring temperatures; 2017 had the second-warmest spring on record. The hottest-ever was last year, in 2016, the same year Americans elected as president someone who’d gone on record dismissing climate change as a Chinese hoax. To a greater degree, but in much the same vein, you can find, on this very day, people living on earth who insist the earth is flat.

In this same silo, we’d like to place people who believe, honestly, that cannabis belongs in Schedule I of the American Controlled Substances Act. But we’d like to put them in a further circle of deniers, since not even America’s leading prohibitionists think marijuana should be classified as thus.

Read more at High Times

Judge Mulling Nevada Bid for Recreational Pot Sales July 1

BY SCOTT SONNER

ASSOCIATED PRESS

CARSON CITY, Nev. (AP) — Nevada’s marijuana regulators are working furiously to launch recreational sales on July 1, a fast-approaching deadline that could hinge on a court deciding whether the powerful liquor industry should be guaranteed a piece of the pot pie before tourists and residents can light up.

Read more at High Times

Does North Korea Have a More Tolerant Pot Policy than South Korea?

Well, absolutely not, but you could be forgiven for thinking so, based on a cursory review of recent headlines.

Although it hasn’t made much of splash stateside, the big news in South Korea this week is the “marijuana scandal” surrounding a singer from the suggestively named K-pop boy-band Big Bang, who goes by the stage-name T.O.P.

He could face five years in the slammer after a hair follicle test by the Seoul Metropolitan Police yielded positive results for cannabis. He was fingered for the test after a young woman busted for “liquid marijuana” (presumably some kind of extract) named him as the supplier, according to Korea Portal.

Read more at High Times

Biggest Drug War Victory? Courts, Governors Tiring of Asset Forfeiture

If cops weren’t allowed to seize your property without a trial—and, in many cases, without even accusing you of a crime—law enforcement in America would be near unrecognizable. For instance, the DEA would be $4 billion poorer.

As the Justice Department’s inspector general noted in March, DEA agents have seized $4 billion in cash over the last decade from travelers under the pretext of drug-related asset forfeiture. In more than 81 percent of the cases reviewed, there were no criminal charges filed, as Reason reported.

Investigations often began after innocuous acts that are not criminal: purchasing a last-minute or one-way ticket, traveling without checked luggage, or flying to a “known source city for drug trafficking.” Conveniently, that would include nearly every major city in America, according to federal drug agents.

Read more at High Times